AI vs. Coronavirus: How Artificial Intelligence is Fighting the Pandemic

The deadly coronavirus, which first appeared in mainland China, has now spread across the world.  The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared it a global pandemic and has reported more than 125,000 cases and 4,500 deaths as of March 12, 2020.

To lend perspective, confirmed cases have already exceeded the number of people infected during the 2002-2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. While the flu and coronavirus are often compared, coronavirus may be deadlier. On average, the seasonal flu strain kills about 0.1% of infected people. Early death rate estimates in the coronavirus outbreak’s epicenter in Wuhan, China, have been around 2%.

Here’s a look at a number of ways artificial intelligence (AI)-based technologies are being deployed in the fight against the outbreak.

Identifying Outbreaks and Quarantining

AI can predict the number of potential new cases by geography and which types of populations face the greatest risk. It can also help with the enhancement of optimization strategies. For example, machine learning—a subset of AI—has already been employed to research and optimize strategies for quarantine efforts among communities, cities and countries to limit the spread of the virus.

Diagnosis and the Search for A Cure 

AI is also lending a hand in diagnosing coronavirus. Hospitals in China are using AI-based software to scan through CT images of patients’ lungs to look for signs of COVID-19, the infection caused by coronavirus.

However, the medical community has historically cultivated vaccines for comparable viruses, so using AI to look at patterns from similar viruses and detect the attributes that will help build a new vaccine gives scientists a higher probability of success than if they’d started creating one from scratch.

And while it doesn’t guarantee a cure, AI provides an important advantage: It helps scientists more quickly discover relationships among diseases and symptoms, drugs and their effect(s) and the patients who might respond to treatment—insights that, due to the sheer amount of biomedical data, could otherwise be missed in a race against time.

The original article can be found here.

To support and develop AI applications for world society matters, Artificial Intelligence World Society Innovation Network (AIWS.net) created AIWS Young Leaders program including Young Leaders and Experts from Australia, Austria, Belgium, Britain, Canada, Denmark, Estonia, France, Finland, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United States, and Vietnam.

Private Kit: Safe Path can help prevent and reduce risk of outbreak of diseases to the community, normalizing life and society

An app that tracks where you have been and who you have crossed paths with—and then shares this personal data with other users in a privacy-preserving way—could help curb the spread of Covid-19, says Ramesh Raskar at the MIT Media Lab, who leads the team behind it. Called Private Kit: Safe Paths, the free and open-source app was developed by people at MIT and Harvard, as well as software engineers at companies such as Facebook and Uber, who worked on it in their free time.

How it works: Private Kit: Safe Paths gets around privacy concerns by sharing encrypted location data between phones in the network in such a way that it does not go through a central authority. This lets users see if they may have come in contact with someone carrying the coronavirus—if that person has shared that information—without knowing who it might be. A person using the app who tests positive can also choose to share location data with health officials, who can then make it public.

Raskar thinks that a fine-grained tracking approach, which would allow specific locations to be closed off and disinfected, is better than blanket shutdowns, which are socially and economically disruptive.

The original article can be found here.

Professor Alex Sandy Pentland, MIT, Co-founder of AIWS Innovation Network (AIWS.net), and Jeff Saviano, Member of AIWS.net, joined this MIT team. AIWS.net recommended a solution to help bring normalization to life and society based on this app.

Postponed Policy Lab – AIWS Summit to September 16-18, 2020

With the spread of COVID -19 growing both in Europe and the US, World Leadership Alliance-Club de Madrid (WLA-CdM) and the Boston Global Forum (BGF) decide to postpone the Boston Policy Lab – AIWS Summit to 16-18, September 2020.

While “Transatlantic Approaches on Digital Governance: A New Social Contract in  Artificial Intelligence Age” was organized in Harvard and MIT offline, WLA-CdM and BGF will organize an online conference and continue to do AIWS Innovation Network (AIWS.net) Roundtable. The AIWS.net Roundtable attracts many distinguished thinkers and leaders to join and contribute ideas to build the Social Contract 2020 and United Nations 2045 project.

Postponed to September 16-18, there are more head of states and governments that can attend the event.

The Coronavirus outbreak risk reminds the world: to prevent peril, all governments have to create transparency, accountability, respect of freedom of expression of all citizens, and collaboration between governments.

Artificial Intelligence Applications: Is Your Business Implementing AI Smartly?

The book Design, Launch, and Scale IoT Services classifies the components of IoT services into technical modules. One of the most important of these is Artificial Intelligence (AI). This article is intended to supplement the book by providing insight into AI and its applications for IoT.

After many years in the wilderness, AI is back on the hype curve and will change the world again. Or, will it? AI has always been interesting, but what has changed to justify the current hype?

There are several contributing factors. The volumes of data that will be produced by many IoT services suggest that this data cannot be managed by humans with traditional analytics tools. Therefore, AI can offer opportunities for IoT services to extract maximum value from the data. IoT cloud platforms are now offering AI services via APIs and application development tools, making AI more accessible for many IoT services. Now, AI can be incorporated without requiring extensive development or excessive costs.

The original article can be found here.

According to AI development and application to society, Michael Dukakis Institute for Leadership and Innovation (MDI) established the Artificial Intelligence World Society Innovation Network (AIWS-IN) for the purpose of promoting ethical norms and practices in the development and use of AI in healthcare, education, transportation, national security, and other areas.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Says 2020 Tokyo Olympics Will Go Ahead, Leaders of AIWS-IN will contribute initiative for the world in time fight COVID-19

Japan is still preparing to host the Olympics, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said on Saturday, despite rising global concern about the viability of the summer Games due to the coronavirus outbreak.

The 2020 Olympics are scheduled to begin July 24 and run through August 9, but the coronavirus outbreak has created doubt as to whether they will be able to take place as planned.

The original article can be found here.

The Boston Global Forum honored Prime Minister Shinzo Abe with the World Leader for Peace, and Cybersecurity Award on Global Cybersecurity Day December 12, 2015 at Harvard University Faculty Club.

In the next days, leaders of AIWS Innovation Network will launch an initiative for people in time to fight COVID-19. This time creates opportunities to innovate our life, our works, and our societies. The world need transparency and collaboration.

AIWS Innovation Network as the Strategic Alliance Host of AI World Government

Mr. Nguyen Anh Tuan, co-founder of AIWS Innovation Network, and Mr. Eliot Weinman Founder & Chair, AI World Conference and Expo, had a very nice lunch at Harvard University Faculty Club on November 16, 2018. At the lunch, Mr. Tuan shared with Mr. Weinman the concepts of AI-Government, a part of AI World Society, and advise AI World Conference and Expo should organize an AI government conference.

Mr. Weinman like this idea, and organized the first very successful AI government conference in DC from 24 to 26 of June 2019. Governor Michael Dukakis, co-founder of AIWS Innovation Network gave keynote opening speech; Professor Thomas Patterson, Harvard University, co-founder of AIWS Innovation Network, presented the concepts of AI-Government; and Professor Nazli Choucri, MIT, Co-founder of AIWS Innovation Network, joined as a panelist of the event.

This year, from 22 to 26 of June, the second AI World Government Conference will be take place in Washington DC.

With AI technology at the forefront of our everyday lives, there are significant efforts already underway by federal agencies to deploy and integrate data-driven government services. In fact, most federal agencies have already begun projects to leverage the rapid rise in availability of intelligent automation solutions. AI World Government gathers leaders from our nation’s strong innovation ecosystem across government, technology, business and research to present the state of the practice and state of the technology to assist in leveraging advanced intelligent technologies to enhance government services.

AIWS Innovation Network, the Strategic Alliance Host of AI World Government, will present AIWS Social Contract 2020, and transparency of AI to more than 1,000 Colleagues at the Largest Independent AI Federal Government Event of the Year 2020.

AI World Government in Washington DC, June 2020

AI World Government, a big conference on AI Government, will be organized in Washington DC from 22 to 24 of June, 2020. AIWS Innovation Network is the Strategic Alliance Host of this event.

AI World Government provides a comprehensive three-day forum to educate and inform public sector agencies on proven strategies and tactics to successfully deploy AI and cognitive technologies. Join leaders from our nation’s strong innovation ecosystem across government, technology, business and research to discuss the state of the practice and state of the technology to assist the public sector in leveraging advanced intelligent technologies to enhance government services. Learn more and register now: http://bit.ly/3aNxE4J

Flexible “Brain” for AI Cuts Energy Use by 80%

Scientists at Osaka University built a new computing device from field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) that can be customized by the user for maximum efficiency in artificial intelligence applications. Compared with currently used rewireable hardware, the system increases circuit density by a factor of 12. Also, it is expected to reduce energy usage by 80%. This advance may lead to flexible artificial intelligence (AI) solutions that provide enhanced performance while consuming much less electricity.

AI is becoming a part of everyday life for almost all consumers. Ridesharing smartphone apps like Uber, Gmail’s spam filters, and smart-home devices like Siri and Nest all rely on AI. However, implementing these algorithms often require a large amount of computing power, which means large electricity bills, as well as big carbon footprints. Systems that could–like the human brain–be rewired to optimize the computer circuitry for each task would provide greatly enhanced energy efficiency.

Normally, we think of hardware, which includes the physical logic gates and transistors of a computer’s processor, as fixed by the manufacturer. However, field-programmable gate arrays are specialized logical elements that can be rewired “in the field” by the user for custom logic applications. The research team used non-volatile “via-switches” that remain connected until the user decided to reconfigure them. Using novel nanofabrication methods, they were able to pack twelve times more elements into a grid-like “crossbar” layout. By reducing the distance electronic signals need to be routed, the devices ended up needing 80% less power.

The original article can be found here.

In 2019, Michael Dukakis Institute for Leadership and Innovation (MDI) established the Artificial Intelligence World Society Innovation Network (AIWS-IN) for the purpose of promoting ethical norms and practices in the development and use of AI in healthcare, education, transportation, national security, and other areas.

AI Recruitment Startup Talview Wins The “Best AI Application for Societal Impact” Recognition at Microsoft’s AI Awards 2.0

AI Recruitment startup, Talview, has received the prestigious “Best AI Application for Societal Impact” award in the partner category in the Microsoft AI Awards 2.0 for its part in a growing community development initiative. Talview has been recognized as a leader in bringing innovative AI solutions to HR and Talent Management at the Microsoft AI Awards for the second year.

Talview is one of the top Microsoft ISV partners and has built its Instahiring Experience platform using Microsoft Azure AI, machine learning and cognitive services. For corporate customers, Talview leverages the capabilities of Microsoft Azure to automate talent screening, video interviews, and securely proctor cognitive assessments for hiring decisions.

Talview won the recognition at AI Awards 2.0 for enabling its not-for-profit client, Head Held High Foundation, to simplify the process of conducting video interviews and assessments. Head Held High is a non-profit organization whose goal is to eradicate poverty and transform the face of India. Head Held High uses Talview’s video interviewing and assessments platform to measure a person’s workplace readiness and help transform their vision of who they can become. The use of Talview’s technology has enabled Head Held High to make a huge societal impact and empower students who are deprived of higher education to access better career options. Talview platforms also make candidates aware of AI technology and test how well they operate computers.

The original article can be found here.

To support and collaborate AI application and Society, Artificial Intelligence World Society Innovation Network (AIWS-IN) created AIWS Young Leaders program including Young Leaders and Experts from Australia, Austria, Belgium, Britain, Canada, Denmark, Estonia, France, Finland, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United States, and Vietnam.

Governor Michael Dukakis, Vint Cerf, and Joseph Nye, together with world leaders, discuss the Social Contract 2020

Former Presidents and PMs from Europe and North America will call for a social contract to govern Artificial Intelligence at Harvard and MIT during a three-day meet April 27-29.

When: April 27 (reception), April 28 and 29

Where: Harvard University and MIT, Cambridge Mass.

Who: World Leadership Alliance-Club de Madrid, an organization of former world leaders & The Boston Global Forum think tank, with Harvard and MIT Scholars

Featured Speakers:

Vint Cerf, widely regarded as the “Father of the Internet”

Joseph S. Nye Jr., University Distinguished Service Professor, Emeritus and former Dean of the Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government.

Moderator: Former Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis,  cofounder of The Boston Global Forum and AIWS Innovation Network

Former Western leaders will meet in Cambridge to create a Social Contract for the Artificial Intelligence Age aimed at enhancing life, fostering equality, and preventing AI—machines that learn and think like humans—from creating a dystopian world of oppression, haves and have-nots and economic disruption.

Delegates will develop a Social Contract to harness Artificial Intelligence in ways that improve our lives without economic disruption and political upheaval.

During the sessions The Boston Global Forum’s AIWS Innovation Network will offer a new model for the AI economy aimed at creating new opportunities, fostering peace, and preserving human rights.

Regulation of AI Should Reflect Current Experience

The rapid proliferation of applications of artificial intelligence and machine learning—or AI, for short—coupled with the potential for significant societal impact has spurred calls around the world for new regulation.

The European Union and China are developing their own rules, and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has developed principles that enjoy the support of its members plus a handful of other countries. In January, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) also issued its own draft guidance, ensuring the United States a seat at the table during this ongoing, multi-year, international conversation.

The U.S. guidance—covering “weak” or narrow AI applications of the kind we experience today—reflects a light-touch approach to regulation, consistent with a desire to reward U.S. ingenuity. Critics say the White House is embracing “permissionless innovation,” which involves the development and circulation of products or services without prior approval from regulators. Supporters have argued that the dynamic, boundary-pushing innovation principle is better than the restrictive precautionary principle.

The original article can be found here.

According to AI regulation, Michael Dukakis Institute for Leadership and Innovation (MDI) established the Artificial Intelligence World Society (AIWS) and AIWS Innovation Network for the purpose of promoting ethical norms and practices in the development and use of AI. AIWS will identify, publish and promote principles for the virtuous application of AI, and AIWS-IN will develop apps consistent with these principles for use in healthcare, education, transportation, national security, and other areas.

Proscia® and UCSF Partner to Deliver Artificial Intelligence Applications That Improve the Accuracy and Speed of Cancer Diagnosis

Proscia, a leading provider of artificial intelligence (AI) enabled digital pathology solutions, and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) have partnered to introduce artificial intelligence into the practice of pathology. Beginning with prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the U.S., the collaboration will validate the clinical efficacy of computational pathology applications for several high-impact pathology subspecialties.

The standard of care for diagnosing cancer relies on the pathologist’s assessment of tissue biopsies viewed under a microscope. This 150-year-old manual and subjective practice cannot keep pace with the rising cancer burden amid a decreasing pathologist workforce. Prostate cancer diagnosis is especially problematic given its high slide-per-case volume, complex reporting requirements, and qualitative grading system, often leading to delayed turnaround times, increased use of ancillary tests, and reduced confidence in treatment decisions.

Proscia and UCSF are collaborating on the validation of computational pathology applications that drive much-needed quality and efficiency gains for clinical laboratories using digital pathology. As one of the earliest adopters of digital pathology for primary diagnosis, UCSF has amassed volumes of diverse, high-quality digitized data. This data is initially being used to ensure that Proscia’s computational pathology application for prostate cancer accurately accounts for the variability that exists across a wide range of diagnoses, methods of biopsy and tissue preparation, tissue staining procedures, and digital scanning processes.

The original article can be found here.

To support and collaborate AI application and Society, Artificial Intelligence World Society Innovation Network (AIWS-IN) created AIWS Young Leaders program including Young Leaders and Experts from Australia, Austria, Belgium, Britain, Canada, Denmark, Estonia, France, Finland, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United States, and Vietnam.

Transatlantic Approaches on Digital Governance: A New Social Contract in Artificial Intelligence

The World Leadership Alliance – Club de Madrid (WLA-CdM) in partnership with the Boston Global Forum (BGF) is organizing a Transatlantic and multi-stakeholder dialogue on global challenges and policy solutions in the context of the need to create a new social contract on digital technologies and Artificial Intelligence (AI). By comparing American and European approaches in the creation of a new social contract on AI and digital governance, under the critical eye of former democratic Heads of State or Government, this policy dialogue will stimulate new thinking and bring out ideas from representatives of governments, academic institutions and think tanks, tech companies, and civil society, from both regions. At the same time, the discussion will generate a space to encourage and strengthen Transatlantic cooperation on the new social contract of digital governance in the framework of needed reforms of the multilateral system and will serve as a platform to establish a Transatlantic Alliance for Digital Governance. Besides, the policy discussion aims to discuss the creation of an initiative to monitor governments as well as companies in using AI and generate an AI Ethics Index at all levels.

Transatlantic Alliance for Digital Governance

The EU wants to become a global leader for AI governance. “There is, however, a gap between Europe’s lofty ambitions and its actual institutional capacity for research, analysis and policy development to define and shape the European way on AI guided by societal values and the public interest. Currently the debate is mostly driven by industry, where most resources and capacity for technical research sit. Compared to industry and business consultancies, European civil society organizations struggle to have as strong an impact on the policy debate. In the US in contrast, there are numerous innovative and highly visible initiatives and research programs that seek to study and address the social, political and ethical challenges of AI in the US. The lack of involvement of civil society poses a serious problem for the EU’s regulatory ambition: Any claims of the EU Commission regarding human-centric and trustworthy AI would be for nought if the concept and underlying regulatory agenda are developed for but not with civil society.” This is the opinion from the report by Stiftung Neue Verantwortung (SNV).

To solve this gap, The Boston Global Forum, World Leadership Alliance-Club de Madrid, and MIT Connection Science will establish The Transatlantic Alliance for Digital Governance. These three institutions will be the residence of the Alliance. The leaders of the Boston Global Forum are Governor Michael Dukakis, Chair, and Mr. Nguyen Anh Tuan, CEO; the leaders of World Leadership Alliance-Club de Madrid are President Danilo Turk and Maria-Elena Aguero, Secretary General; and the leader of MIT Connection Science is Professor Alex Pentland.

Can the EU become a global leader for AI governance?

With WHITE PAPER “On Artificial Intelligence – A European approach to excellence and trust”, the EU have an ambition to become a global leader for AI governance. This is needed in the context of the world today. However, the EU lack civil societies to join and support this program. To solve this gap between EU’s ambition and capacity, Boston Global Forum and World Leadership Alliance Club de Madrid co-organize the conference “Transatlantic Approaches on Digital Governance: A New Social Contract in Artificial Intelligence” at Harvard University and MIT from April 27 to 29, 2020.

We are pleasured to introduce the report “Towards a European AI & Society Ecosystem” by Stiftung Neue Verantwortung (SNV).

Governing AI is crucial to ensure that its development and deployment are aligned with our (European) values and societal interests. While many look to Silicon Valley or increasingly to China to catch the latest trends and technological advances, all eyes are on the European Union concerning the question of where global leadership on AI governance will appear.

The United States is widely seen as the global leader in AI – both in terms of academic output and commercial applications. There are also strong NGOs and interdisciplinary research programs that study potential harms and social risks associated with the technology. However, given the political tides in Washington D.C. and the policy priorities of the Trump administration, the United States is currently unable and unwilling to shape global norms and regulate AI. China aspires to global leadership in AI but its use of AI for social control, surveillance and censorship clash with democratic principles. Simply copying and pasting one of these models into the European context would be incompatible with European culture, values, laws and social contexts. This makes Europe currently the only region where a regulatory agenda on AI rooted in democratic values can be established and – given the size of the EU’s internal market – and have a reasonable potential for global impact. Europe has generally embraced the role as a global regulator of technology. For many EU policy makers, the GDPR serves as a model, demonstrating the EU’s ability to set global standards in the tech sector.

How AI Can Live Up To Its Hype In The Healthcare Industry

“What’s the problem you’re trying to solve?” Clayton Christensen, the late Harvard business professor, was famous for posing this aphoristic question to aspiring entrepreneurs.

By asking it, he was teaching those in earshot an important lesson: Innovation, alone, isn’t the end goal. To succeed, ideas and products must address fundamental human problems.

This is especially true in healthcare, where artificial intelligence is fueling the hopes of an industry desperate for better solutions.

But here’s the problem: Tech companies too often set out to create AI innovations they can sell, rather than trying to understand the problems doctors and patients need solved. At many traditional med-tech conferences and trade shows, for example, talks and sales pitches focus squarely on the technology while routinely overlooking the human fears and frustrations that AI can address.

Because of this failure to prioritize human needs above business interests, medicine’s most-hyped AI applications have, repeatedly, failed to move the needle on public healthpatient safety or healthcare costs.

“Addressing the challenges and opportunities around how technology affects our community is hugely important,” said Hugh Forrest, Chief Programming Officer at South by Southwest (SXSW) conference. “From privacy to blockchain to AI to MedTech, using this lens to filter how we look at a lot of issues facing modern society allows us to connect the dots in a deeper way. Especially in the case of an area like AI, where there’s quite a bit of uncertainty and fear, we also want to showcase how these innovations can be ethical and improve lives.”

The original article can be found here.

According to AI application in the society and healthcare, AI World Society has established AIWS Innovation Network will connect key AI actors and provide services that

Artificial intelligence set to jazz up software development and deployment

Artificial intelligence and machine learning have the potential to boost many, many areas of the enterprise. As explored in my recent post, it is capable of accelerating and adding intelligence to supply chain management, human resources, sales, marketing and finance. Oh, and one more area, by the way — IT management.

The inevitable impact of AI on IT departments was touched on in a recent survey of 2,280 business leaders from MIT Sloan Management Review and SAS, which finds that in these early days of AI, IT professionals will be feeling the greatest impact — both from a career and an operational point of view..

CIOs, chief data officers, and chief analytics officers will be on the front lines of AI implementations, the study finds. IT road maps, software development, deployment processes, and data environments are likely to be transformed in the near future.

Most IT managers report that they are still developing foundational capabilities for AI — cloud or data center infrastructure, cybersecurity, data management, development processes and workflow.

The original article can be found here.

To support and collaborate AI application and IT operation, Artificial Intelligence World Society Innovation Network (AIWS-IN) created AIWS Young Leaders program including Young Leaders and Experts from Australia, Austria, Belgium, Britain, Canada, Denmark, Estonia, France, Finland, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United States, and Vietnam.