CEO of Boston Global Forum speaks about the Future of EU on the Global Stage at 8th Global Baku Forum 2021

On November 6, 2021, Mr. Nguyen Anh Tuan, co-founder and CEO of the Boston Global Forum, spoke at the Panel “Future of EU on the Global Stage” together with panelists Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovic, President of Croatia 2015-2020, Yves Leterme, Prime Minister of Belgium 2008, 2009-2011, Emil Constantinescu, President of Romania 1996-2000, moderated by Vaira Vike-Freiberga, President of Latvia 1999-2007; Co-Chair, NGIC. Mr. Nguyen Anh Tuan contributed ideas in maintaining the role and position of EU in the Age of AI and Digital, below are his key messages:

  1. EU can lead in building an Age of Global Enlightenment
  • Europe was the major contributor to the Enlightenment in the 18th century.
  • Today with AI, Digital, and Blockchain, the world needs a new model for politics, society, and economy based on democratic values and standards.
  • The EU can play a leading role in collaboration with the US to make the Age of Global Enlightenment – Smart Democracy.
  • In 2020, BGF created the Social Contract for the AI Age.
  • The Social Contract for the AI Age is the fundamentals and standards for international relations and of the Age of Global Enlightenment.
  • Relations with the US, Russia, and China are defined on standards of the Social Contract for the AI Age
  1. EU can lead to Global Alliance for Digital Governance
  • Building and leading Global Alliance for Digital Governance.
  • The first step: EU lead in solving misinformation, disinformation, and global enlightenment education.

Key Conclusions of the Final Report from the Club de Madrid Policy Lab “Fundamental Rights in AI & Digital Societies: Towards an International Accord”

 

  • There is no doubt that digital technologies, and AI, in particular, have, for better or for worse, generated a revolution for fundamental rights. Building an international agreement on digital governance has complexities and the global policy and geopolitical environment plays a key role in facilitating or limiting the construction of this agreement.
  • Common democratic values such as respect and promotion of human rights, and the rule of law are crucial to underpinning digital policy as an essential starting point to move towards that agreement.
  • Challenges such as AI and data governance that domestic frameworks cannot address alone are crucial points on which we must focus. From there, we can start with small but important steps to build a culture of agreement on digital issues – _with a premium on the Transatlantic space, that has the advantage of shared values.
  • In a field where so much is yet to come, we are convinced that international cooperation for Artificial Intelligence and digital technologies is an opportunity to write the rules together. The Framework for AI International Accord, a part of the e-book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”, presented at this Policy Lab is a significant start for this goal.
  • We need some internationally agreed fundamental rules or norms to guide the development of technologies; we cannot anticipate to protect rights we do not fully comprehend; and the efforts that already exist are essential to continue working on the objective that gathered us these three days. It will be a challenging process, because of the variety of values and approaches that are emerging in different parts of the world, but there is common ground to be found. And to that end, making principles operational and integrating a variety of stakeholders representing countries and communities in all their diversity, including inter-generational differences is needed.
  • Many of the issues discussed intersect with the crucial work the UN is both doing and planning to do, under the leadership of Secretary-General Guterres, to maintain international peace and security, and support the achievement of the SDGs. AI, cybersecurity, diplomacy, and development – _not least social development – _all relate to defense and promotion of fundamental rights in the digital sphere. It is our aim that our recommendations, the United Nations Centennial Initiative, and the book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment” support ‘Our Common Agenda’ and, particularly, the Global Digital Compact proposal.
  • There is no lack of goodwill and effort to build an AI framework on which different actors – governments, local governments, and non-government actors can agree. The UNESCO Recommendation on the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence is a promising step in the right direction.
  • We have also established a Global Alliance for Digital Governance that includes relevant stakeholders -governments, private sector, academia, civil society, international organizations- to reduce the digital field’s development gaps and bring communities together, thus contributing to the United Nations Centennial Initiative.
  • We agreed on the need for a new social contract that takes digital transformation into account. To build a social contract suited for the digital age, going beyond traditional allies and reach out to those who think differently is crucial. The Social Contract for the AI Age is a recognized tool and will be fundamental for the Age of Global Enlightenment.
  • Throughout this process of reflection, trust is essential and to obtain that we would need to build on security, privacy, reliability and fairness as crucial pillars that will promote digital technologies as a tool to serve inclusive societies.
  • Protecting access to information, education and digital literacy and finding a balance between freedom of speech and the imperative to have a common truth will allow progress on drafting common rules on AI. In this regard, the AIWS City will be a practical model for addressing this issue.
  • It is tough to craft legislation and rules for technologies that are not yet being used, so we need a risk-based approach to digital governance. In the case of AI, this approach will help to elaborate some of the requirements for its design, development and application phases.
  • Ex ante and ex-post regulation are not incompatible. We need both to better govern digital. Ex ante regulation will allow institutions to provide guardrails for rights, including data rights, in the deployment of AI systems. Ex post regulation will allow AI systems to be audited. In this regard, we agreed accountability is a fundamental consideration in the deployment of AI technologies. We need to be able to explain how AI systems reach the decisions they reach and will allow us to work to stop the dynamics of discrimination, exclusion and inequalities that are being replicated and amplified by AI technologies. The Global Alliance for Digital Governance can be a significant movement for this mission.
  • The Community Innovation Economy concept was introduced during the Policy Lab as a tool that empowers citizens to create value for themselves, for others, and for society through the application of AI, digital, block chain, and data science technologies. It is a sharing ecosystem that rewards both the creators and users of these technologies, as well as an ecosystem that encourages everyone to innovate.
  • Despite the existing gaps in the regulation of digital technologies and their use, they have been fundamental tools of resilience during the COVID-19 pandemic and we must not forget their benefits.
  • Finally, we would like to mention that many of the discussions of the six Plenaries highlighted the significant contributions of the e-book, “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”, published by the UN Centennial Initiative and the Boston Global Forum.

8th Global Baku Forum 2021 “The world after COVID-19”, Social Contract for the AI Age recommended as standard for international relation

With more than 40 presidents, prime ministers and distinguished leaders and thinkers, under a 3-day agenda, the Global Baku Forum was hosted on November 4-6, 2021.

The Social Contract for the AI Age was recommended as a standard for international relation.

Here are some participants from the Global Baku Forum:

 

Ilham Aliyev, President of the Republic of Azerbaijan

Milo Dukanovic, President of Montenegro

Sefik Dzaferovic, Member of the Presidency of Bosnia & Herzegovina

Egils Levits, President of the Republic of Latvia

Nathalia Gavrilita, Prime Minister of Moldova

Mohammad Shtayyeh, Prime Minister of the State of Palestine

His Holiness Pope Francis, Head of Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City State

Tatiana Valovaya, Director-General, United Nations Office at Geneva

Miguel Angel Moratinos, UN High Representative for the Alliance of Civilizations

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization

Vaira Vike-Freiberga, Co-Chair, NGIC; President of Latvia 1999-2007

Ismail Serageldin, Co-Chair, NGIC; Vice President of the World Bank 1992-2000

Tarja Halonen, President of Finland 2000-2012

Ivo Josipovic, President of Croatia 2010-2015

Zlatko Lagumdzija, Prime Minister of Bosnia and Herzegovina 2001-2002; deputy Prime Minister of Bosnia and Herzegovina 2012-2015

Yves Leterme, Prime Minister of Belgium 2008, 2009-2011

Gordon Brown, Prime Minister of the UK 2007-2010

Ehud Barak, Prime Minister of Israel 1999-2001

Helen Clark, Prime Minister of New Zealand 1999-2008

Emil Constantinescu, President of Romania 1996-2000

Chiril Gaburici, Prime Minister of Moldova 2015

Ameenah Gurib-Fakim, President of Mauritius 2015-2018

Dalia Itzik, President of Israel 2007, President of Knesset 2006-2009

Gjorge Ivanov, President of North Macedonia 2009-2019

Mladen Ivanic, President of Bosnia and Herzegovina 2014-2018

Jan Fischer, Prime Minister of the Czech Republic 2009-2010

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovic, President of Croatia 2015-2020

Petru Lucinschi, President of Moldova 1997-2001

Igor Luksic, Prime Minister of Montenegro 2010-2012

Moussa Mara, Prime Minister of Mali 2014-2015

Stjepan Mesic, President of Croatia 2000-2010

Festus Mogae, President of Botswana 1998-2008; Special Envoy of the United Nations Secretary-General on Climate Change

Petre Roman, Prime Minister of Romania 1989-1991

Rosalia Arteago, Serrano President of Ecuador 1997

Laimdota Straujuma, Prime Minister of Latvia 2014-2016

Danilo Turk, President of Slovenia 2007-2012

Viktor Yushchenko, President of Ukraine 2005-2010

Binali Yildirim, Prime Minister of Turkey 2016-2018; Speaker of the Grand National Assembly 2018-2019

Valdis Zatlers, President of Latvia 2007-2011

Amre Moussa Secretary-General, Arab League 2001-2011; Minister of Foreign Affairs of Egypt 1991-2001

Rosen Plevneliev, President of Bulgaria 2012-2017

Petar Stoyanov, President of Bulgaria 1997-2002

Boris Tadic, President of Serbia 2004-2012

Filip Vujanovic, President of Montenegro 2003-2018

Eka Tkeshelashvili, Deputy Prime Minister of Georgia 2010-2012

Kateryna Yushchenko, First Lady of Ukraine 2005-2010

Ana Birchall, Deputy Prime Minister of Romania 2018-2019; Minister of Justice 2019; Member of the Parliament of Romania

Gennady Burbulis, First Deputy Prime Minister to the Russian Federation 1991-1992, State Secretary

Cemil Chichek, Deputy Prime Minister of Turkey 2007-2011; Speaker of the Grand National Assembly 2011-2015

Volkan Bozkır, President of the 75th UN General Assembly; Minister of European Union Affairs of the Republic of Turkey 2015-2016

Mats Karlsson, Former Vice-President of the World Bank

Ouided Bouchamaoui, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate 2015

Nguyen Anh Tuan, Co-founder and CEO of the Boston Global Forum, the Editor of the book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”.

 

Link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ulbgl_FmJzI

 

Boston Global Forum is a partner of NGIC.

AIWS City at the Policy Dialog “Rethinking Democracy”

Club de Madrid’s members contributed to Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment, making them distinguished leaders of Global Enlightenment Community in AIWS City.

We introduced some significant ideas of speakers at the Policy Dialog “Rethinking Democracy” organized by Club de Madrid in partnership with Boston Global Forum on October 27-29, 2021.

Regarding the continued support of international financial institutions towards increasingly autocratic states such as Nicaragua, Laura Chinchilla, Vice President of Club de Madrid and former President of Costa Rica stated: “International Financial Institutions must stop focusing only on the macro- economic and start looking at human rights”.

The former President of Costa Rica warned that international and regional organisations must act sooner when faced with a crisis of democracy. “If we operate under the logic that everything is fine, until everything is wrong, we end up with situations such as that of Nicaragua”, Chinchilla added.

Zsuzsanna Szelényi, Member of the Hungarian Parliament (2014-2018), explained the recent concerted effort by the Hungarian opposition to defeat Viktor Orban in the upcoming national election. Parties were able to come together and elect a single candidate by leveraging technology and digital activism. “Everything was online, as the public media was captured by the government. We now have the result, a candidate, who is a charismatic newcomer”, Szelényi said.

As a result of this experience, Szelényi concludes that “technology can deeply and strongly support democratic innovation”, but “it wouldn’t have worked without people first, coming out to the streets, and activists organising from behind”.

Policy Dialog 2021 raise about the Social Contract for the AI Age

Speaking at Club de Madrid’s Policy Dialog “Rethinking Democracy” on October 27, 2021, Professor Thomas Patterson, Harvard University, co-founder of the Boston Global Forum, Distinguished Contributor of Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment, highlighted the Social Contract for the AI Age and concepts in the book as fundamentals for democracy in the digital era.

Aleksander Kwasniewski, former President of Poland, claimed that “after the collapse of the USSR, we thought that ‘the End of History’ was here but China offers a real alternative that for many is more appealing than democracy. In China we have a real competitor”.

In this line, Derek Mitchell, President of the National Democratic Institute, urged that “We need to understand how China works at home and abroad”. At the same time, he stated that the decline in the quality of democracy “is a practical challenge, not a theoretical one. We need to ensure democracy delivers”. 

Democracy is no longer a matter of voting every 4 years and then exercising a mandate until the next election. “We need new schemes of representation, a more liquid democracy”, said Former PM of Belgium Yves Leterme.

Former PM of the Netherlands Jan Peter Balkenende, emphasised democratic culture: “Democracy is not the majority winning and dominating, but rather the majority taking care of the minority”.

Former Vice President of Costa Rica Casas-Zamora also encouraged democratic innovation in terms of representation: “The basic setups of democracy have been around for 100 years. It is time to rethink it. It is time to be bold, embrace innovation and reform. We need to come up with new institutions and new types of deliberation”. 

Speakers demanded of the upcoming Democracy Summit convened by U.S. President, Joe Biden, to make a categorical defence of democracy. Activists expressed the need for democracies to become more proactive in defending such systems internally and externally.

UNESCO Media and Information Literacy Week Roundtable “Global Enlightenment Education solve misinformation and disinformation”

On October 28, 2021, to promote and support UNESCO Media and Information Literacy Week, Boston Global Forum organized the Roundtable “Global Enlightenment Education solve misinformation and disinformation”. Mr. Ramu Damodaran, the first Chief of United Nations Academic Impact and Co-Chair of the United Nations Centennial Initiative, was the moderator of the Roundtable.

 

Prime Minister Zlatko Lagumdzija, member of Club de Madrid, one of Coordinators of Global Alliance for Digital Governance raised:

In last two years, Boston Global Forum and Club de Madrid, and UN Academic Impact as well, collaborated especially in the context of putting together the Social Contract for the AI Age, putting efforts together as an alliance of like-minded people and entities to do something that will cause to get artificial intelligence, an issue of artificial intelligence, closer to what the purpose of every technology is supposed to be, which is, basically speaking, for progress and prosperity of the human being.

In that context, Boston Global Forum participated a lot in Club de Madrid Policy Dialogue that was dealing with an issue of we think in major topics of democracy.

To solve disinformation and misinformation practically, we build the new information ecosystem that has to be built as a result of the technological developments and prospects of democracy that we want to build.

 

Professor David Silbersweig, Harvard University, Board Member of Global Enlightenment Education Program, introduced the Global Enlightenment Education Program as an important part of AI World Society and the United Nations Centennial Initiative, and said:

The increased powers that technology gives it and the increased powers of the nation states and bad actors are small groups and the vulnerability of the population to mass manipulation on a scale and with an acceleration that is enabled by the technology so the solutions need to be technologically enabled and need to be informed by our latest understanding.

The Global Alliance for Digital Governance at the Policy Dialog “Rethinking Democracy”

Distinguished Contributors of Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment and Coordinators of Global Alliance for Digital Governance Paul Nemitz and Professor Thomas Patterson spoke at the Policy Dialog 2021. They brought ideas from discussions in building Global Law and Accord on AI and Digital.

“Technology, well-framed with legal instruments, will be conducive to democracy. We found that with radio -used by Nazis first, then regulated and a factor for democracy, and with TV). TV and Radio needed rules to be good for democracy. It’s time to do it with the internet and AI”, said Paul Nemitz, Principal Advisor, Directorate-General for Justice and Consumers at the European Commission.

Participants reflected on the nature and potential development of democracy, its institutions and mechanisms. “You need a state, rule of law and democracy. And we need to find a balance between state and individual freedom. We also need a system in which a majority cannot impose its will on a minority”, said Alexander Stubb, the former Prime Minister of Finland.

Ricardo Lagos, former president of Chile, noted how politics today are “much more horizontal” thanks to platforms and technologies by which politicians are able to directly communicate with citizens. “Politicians could have more established institutions to listen to the people and learn their demands”, he said.

Anna-Lena von Hodenburg, the CEO of HateAid, said that leaving platforms to self-regulate does not work to address the floods of disinformation and hate speech online driving polarisation. We need balanced regulation instead. Von Hodenburg called for more rights for users and transparency from platforms.

Regarding new information technologies, Derek Mitchell, President of National Democratic Institute stated that “The digital will kill democracy. Our inability to fight the disinformation battle is daunting. Without a strong information basis to build consensus, democracy cannot succeed”.’

The book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment” recommended and discussed at Policy Dialog “Rethinking Democracy”

Boston Global Forum partnered with Club de Madrid in organizing the Policy Dialog “Rethinking Democracy”

CdM again partnered with the Boston Global Forum, its renowned scholars and the Global Alliance for Digital Governance, which serve to coordinate distinguished leaders, strategists, thinkers, and innovators, the creation of a Global Law and Accord on AI and Digital, and contribute concepts for mechanisms with strong enforcement potentials.

In the Opening Remarks at the Policy Dialog 2021, President of CdM Danilo Turk stressed:

“In a field where so much is yet to come, we are convinced that international cooperation for Artificial Intelligence and digital technologies is an opportunity to write the rules together. The Framework for AI International Accord, a part of the Book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”, presented at CdM-BGF Policy Lab September 2021 is a significant start for this goal.”

In the Policy Dialog, Gordon Brown, the former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom highlighted nationalism as a key ideology distorting democratic governance. “People need to work together to solve problems. If we fail to do so, democracy suffers. One ill of democracy we can’t ignore is that we are facing political nationalism, which is a dominant ideology today”, Brown added.

Laura Chinchilla, former president of Costa Ricca, said that education is the number one factor shaping a generation of democratic citizens. “Educating people on democratic values can really make a difference. We should emphasise civic education in our solutions”, Chinchilla stated. Likewise, Gordon Brown highlighted a growing individualism in citizens’ perception of democratic rights: “There is a missed connection that your rights depend on other people having rights as well”, said the former Prime Minister.

“Democracy is also about prosperity. People need to eat. Supporting elections is not enough to defend democracy nowadays” said Emma Jeblaoui, the President of the International Institute in Human Development. Regarding the experience in Tunisia, Jeblaoui expressed that “democracy support is not only about giving money. It’s also about following up on the reforms and not only sending a cheque and visiting once a year for a group photo.”

Concluding of the 3-days of rich and wide discussions of the Policy Dialog 2021: To succeed in the global fight against authoritarianism, democracies are required to ensure that information ecosystems support safe, healthy, and fully functioning societies. Citizens and public interest should be at the core of all decision‐making.

United Nations Centennial Initiative and United Nations Day October 24th

Ramu Damodaran, the first Chief of United Nations Academic Impact (2010-2021), Co-Chair of the United Nations Centennial Initiative

In a phrase later paraphrased by, and hence often misattributed to, Dag Hammarskjold, Henry Cabot Lodge said of the then new United Nations that it would not “bring us to heaven, but might save us from hell.” As we observe the organization’s 76th anniversary on October 24, perceptions of both hell and heaven have become more proximate, the impact of the pandemic, or personal escape from it, a measuring rod, shaping also the ecumenical “Our Common Agenda” authored by UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres last month as a moral, as much as political, compass for our common future.

Drawing upon rich sources, including a global conversation launched in 2020 that aggregated responses from 1.5 million people, the report builds upon Guterres’s determination that the 75th anniversary of the United Nations be opportunity to shape the future rather than celebrate the past, an idea that informed the Boston Global Forum’s own United Nations Centennial Initiative, looking at how the world would be in 2045, the moment the Organization reached a hundred years. Central to both the “Common Agenda” and our effort is the imperative of a new social contract, one Guterres defines as “between governments and their people and within societies so as to rebuild trust and embrace a comprehensive vision of human rights”, and one which we, in the specific context of our age of artificial intelligence (AI), see based upon “dialogue, tolerance, learning and understanding on key principles and practices for an agreement among members of society for shared social benefit.”

We see the shape of such agreement leading to the United Nations extending international human rights standards to AI (contributing to the “comprehensive vision” Guterres suggests), adopting a convention on the use of AI and establishing a specialized UN agency on AI. We have at least two precedents to draw upon, including the very first resolution adopted by the United Nations General Assembly, Resolution 1/1 of January 1946.

The four months between the signing of the UN Charter by its original members, on June 26,1945, and the formal launch of the Organization, on October 24, were punctuated by an event unforeseen when the Charter was drafted, the use of atomic weapons in August. That inspired the resolution “to deal with the problems raised by the discovery of atomic energy” and its creation of the UN Atomic Energy Commission with an objective to use atomic energy only for peaceful purposes. While there were certainly infirmities and evasions in the resolution, including the placement of the Commission under the authority of the Security Council rather than General Assembly, and its dissolution within a few years, it did set the pace for the International Atomic Energy Agency to emerge and, more immediately, the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons which entered into force for its signatories in February this year.

A second precedent is the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), charged with the implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention with its unique provision for on-site inspections of operational chemical weapons destruction facilities as well as “challenge” inspections of use or production of chemical weapons alleged, with provision of verifiable proof, by one or more States against another. Worth noting is that although it has a working relationship with the United Nations, OPCW is not itself a UN body.

Both a Social Contract for the AI age and an alliance or compact for digital governance can be fashioned by nations within the forums of the United Nations or outside, as the precedents of IAEA and OPCW show. Our preference, given the leadership of the Secretary-General, would be the former; it is odd that, in 2021, matters relating to AI are dispersed among UN entities as disparate as its Conference on Disarmament, its Inter-regional Crime and Justice Research Institute and the International Telecommunications Union. Sound and swift multilateral action can inspire creative academic, scientific and civil society endeavors, including the emergence of an AI “World Society” (AIWS) and of AIWS Cities, urban centers for innovation and reflection, both of which we suggest in our own report.

As we repair our world and our lives, the moment is opportune. As Derek Walcott, the Nobel literature laureate who taught at Boston University for a number of years reminded us, when you “break a vase, the love that reassembles the fragments is stronger than that love which took its symmetry for granted when it was whole.” Let’s seize that strength.

“Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment” will be presented at the Policy Dialog of Club de Madrid

Harvard Professor Thomas Patterson, co-founder of the Boston Global Forum, will present key concepts of the Age of Global Enlightenment from Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment at the World Leadership Alliance – Club de Madrid’s Policy Dialog 2021:

17:00 – 18:30 CET / 11:00 – 12:30 EST

PLENARY SESSION II, The power of technology, leadership and citizen´s resilience

Democracies all over the world are facing similar challenges. This session is devoted to reflecting on three powerful tools to protect and prepare our democracies for the future: digital democracy, responsible leadership and citizen´s resilience. Pan Co-Author of the Book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”

Panelists will propose policy recommendations that help define strategies to foster this kind of technology, leadership and citizenship to rebuild trust in democracy.

  • Dalia Grybauskaitė,President of Lithuania (2009-2019) and Member of CdM
  • Paul Nemitz,Principal Advisor, Directorate-General for Justice and Consumers, European Commission
  • Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya,Leader of Democratic Belarus and a human rights activist
  • Tania Bruguera,Cuban Artist and Activist
  • Thomas Patterson,Research Director of the Michael Dukakis Institute for Leadership and Innovation; Harvard Kennedy School, Boston Global Forum

Session facilitated by Peter Loewen, Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

 

Link: https://rethinking-democracy.vconnect.tv/register/#signup

 

Global Enlightenment Education at UNESCO Global Media and Information Literacy Week 2021

3:30 PM – 4:30 PM EST, Oct 28, 2021

Moderator: Ramu Damodaran, first Chief of United Nations Academic Impact, co-chair of the United Nations Centennial Initiative

Speakers: Prime Minister Zlatko Lagumdzija, Harvard Professor David Silbersweig

The moderator and speakers will present and discuss on how Global Enlightenment Education Program of the United Nations Centennial Initiative will contribute to solve the issues of misinformation and disinformation.

This is the first side event to Club de Madrid’s Policy Dialog 2021 “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”

The United Nations came into being in 1945 as a cerebral, as much as political, innovation, the very first resolution of its General Assembly, in the January of 1946, was on the “problems arising from the discovery of atomic energy.” 75 years later, in the January of 2021, Governor Michael Dukakis announced the “Artificial Intelligence International Accord Initiative” whose goal he described as “to stimulate a global conversation that will make sure AI is used responsibly by governments and the private sector around the world.” It is precisely conversations of that nature that can nurture an era of global enlightenment as we approach the United Nations centennial in less than a quarter century. An era that can shape a world governed by international law and the exercise of international as much as individual, and indeed intellectual, responsibility where the creativity and innovation of the human person work to shape a world worthy of our times just as surely as that world works to foster and further, in the phrase of the United Nations Charter, the “dignity and worth“ of that human person.

In preparation for that transition and achievement, the Boston Global Forum (BGF) and Club de Madrid are choreographing a series of interviews with eminent thinkers on “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment” as side events of their joint Policy Dialogue 2021. These will be telecast by major media in Vietnam and in New York and will be accessible on the BGF website.

 

From Oct 27, 2021 to December 12, 2021:

Format: discussion with selected speakers of CdM Policy Dialog 2021, or distinguished leaders, thinkers, strategists, innovators about Rethinking Democracy

Title of Series: Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment

Topics:

  • Global Enlightenment Education to solve Disinformation, Misinformation
  • New innovation ecosystems for community innovation economy
  • Smart democracy
  • AIWS City and Flagship cities in the Age of Global Enlightenment

Moderators: Ramu Damodaran, Professor Thomas Patterson, Professor David Silbersweig, Professor Nazli Choucri

 

Other side events:

Global Enlightenment Education at UNESCO Global Media and Information Literacy Week 2021

3:30 PM – 4:30 PM EST, Oct 28, 2021

Moderator: Ramu Damodaran,

Speakers: Prime Minister Zlatko Lagumdzija, Harvard Professor David Silbersweig

 

Building Nha Trang Khanh Hoa in becoming a flagship area in the Age of Global Enlightenment

7:00 AM – 8:30 AM, EST, October 29, 2021

Law and Governance in the Age of AI Conference in Vietnam discussed about Fundamentals of the International Law on AI

The Framework of Global Laws and Accord on AI and Digital and Global Alliance for Digital Governance were introduced and discussed at the conference “Law and Governance in the Age of AI”, co-organized by Vietnam National University (VNU) and IFI on October 21, 2021.

Scholars of the School of Law, Vietnam National University were pleased to contribute to the initiative of Boston Global Forum, to build the Age of Global Enlightenment.

 

Presentation

Keynote on Social Contract on the Age of AI and Review on the Book “Remaking the World Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”

 

Moderator:

Mr. Nguyễn Anh Tuấn, CEO of The Boston Global Forum (BGF), co-founder of the AIWS City (AIWS.city); Founder, CEO, and Editor-in-Chief of VietNamNet (1997-2011)

 

Fundamentals of International Law on AI and Digital

Mr. Paul Nemitz, Principal Advisor in the Directorate General for Justice and Consumers, European Commission

 

Law and governance: a comparative Study on Asian national policies and Strategies

Mr. Đặng Minh Tuấn, Deputy Head of the Constitutional and Administrative Law Department, School of Law, VNU

 

The Use of AI in Civil Justice System: Perspectives and Challenges for Access to Justice

Mrs. Nguyễn Thị Bích Thảo, Deputy Head of Civil Law Department, School of Law, VNU

 

The social credit system in china: a state governance system and its adverse impact on human rights

Mr. Nguyễn Văn Quân, School of Law, VNU

 

Secretary: Mrs. Vu Thi My Le, IFI

Building Nha Trang Khanh Hoa in becoming a flagship area in the Age of Global Enlightenment

7:00 am – 8:30 am, EST, October 29, 2021

Organizers: Boston Global Forum and Club de Madrid

This is s special side event to Club de Madrid’s Policy Dialog 2021

 

Moderator:

Thomas Patterson, Co-founder of the Boston Global Forum, Harvard professor, Co-Author of the Book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”

 

Keynote Speakers:

Governor Michael Dukakis, Co-founder and Chair of the Boston Global Forum, Co-Author of the Book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment” 

Nguyen Hai Ninh, Chief of Party of Nha Trang Khanh Hoa

 

Panelists:

Nguyen Tan Tuan, Governor of Nha Trang Khanh Hoa

Ho Van Mung, Chief of Party of Nha Trang City

Alex Sandy Pentland, MIT professor, Co-Author of the Book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”

John Quelch, Co-founder of the Boston Global Forum, Harvard Business School professor

Prime Minister Zlatko Lagumdzija, Co-Author of the Book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”

President Vaira Vike-Freiberga, President of Club de Madrid (2014-2020), Co-Author of the Book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”

David Silbersweig, Harvard Professor, BGF Board Member

David Bray, the top “24 Americans Who Are Changing the World” under 40

Nguyen Anh Tuan, Co-founder and CEO of the Boston Global Forum, Co-Author of the Book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”

AIWS City at the Riga Conference 2021

The AIWS Value System is innovative and, as such, untested for its utility. AIWS will test the concept by creating the AIWS City, which will be a virtual digital city dedicated to promoting the values associated AIWS.

Professor Thomas Patterson introduced AIWS City as a practical model for the Age of Global Enlightenment and discuss about it with Moderator Zaneta Ozolina at the session “REMAKING THE WORLD – THE SECOND AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT. THE UNITED NATIONS 2045”, the Riga Conference 2021, October 14, 2021.

The United Nations Centennial initiative was launched by the Boston Global Forum (BGF) and the United Nations Academic Impact (UNAI) in 2019 as the United Nations planned to mark the 75th anniversary the following year. It brought into its fold some of the finest minds of our times as they sought to anticipate the world, and the United Nations, in 2045, the year of the world organization’s centennial. The core concepts of the initiative are reflected in the book “Remaking the World: Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”; these include the idea of a social contract for the Artificial Intelligence (AI) age, a framework for an AI international accord, an ecosystem for the “AI World Society” (AIWS) and a community innovation economy. Some of these ideas have already begun to be put into practice, including a Global Alliance for Digital Governance and the evolution of AIWS City, a virtual digital city dedicated to promoting the values associated with AIWS.

This session discussed concepts of the book to build the Age of Global Enlightenment, and the particular role of the Baltic States – who celebrate thirty years of United Nations membership this year-in this regard.

Speakers:

Dr Vaira Vīķe- Freiberga, President of the Republic of Latvia from 1999 to 2007

Nguyen Anh Tuan, CEO of the Boston Global Forum, Director of the Michael Dukakis Institute for Leadership and Innovation, Co-Founder of the AI World Society Innovation Network, Co-Founder of AIWS City

Paul F. Nemitz, Director for Fundamental rights and Union citizenship in the Directorate-General for JUSTICE of the European Commission

Alex `Sandy’ Pentland, Director of the Human Dynamics Laboratory, MIT’s, Director of the MIT Media Lab Entrepreneurship Program, Co-Leader of The World Economic Forum Big Data and Personal Data Initiatives, Founding Member of The Advisory Boards for Nissan, Motorola Mobility, Telefonica

Thomas Patterson, Research Director of The Michael Dukakis Institute for Leadership and Innovation, Professor of Government and the Press of Harvard Kennedy School, Distinguished Contributor to the Book “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”

Moderator: Prof Žaneta Ozoliņa, Chairwoman of the Latvian Transatlantic Organisation.

 

Link:

https://fb.watch/8IdvBeUlYR/

and:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cu-2r7qzYZo&t=20490s

World Leaders join special series “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”

Policy Dialogue 2021: Rethinking Democracy

Club de Madrid’s Annual Policy Dialogue will be held on 27, 28, 29 October. Action Labs will take place on 18, 19, 20 October.

The Boston Global Forum (BGF) is a partner of Club de Madrid in organizing the Policy Dialog 2021.

BGF will introduce the book Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment as principles and solutions for Rethinking Democracy.

BGF and Club de Madrid will co-organize special series “Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment”, a dialog between distinguished leaders to build the Age of Global Enlightenment.

The moderators of this special series are Ramu Damodaran, the First Chief of United Nations Academic Impact (2010-2021), co-chair of the United Nations Centennial Initiative, and Harvard professors David Silbersweig and Thomas Patterson.

In spite of its inevitable imperfections, democracy has served humankind well, making systems and institutions stronger, able to meet citizens’ demands. But there is growing evidence that in many places of the world, democracy is wilting away.

Even in established democracies, the level of disruption indicates that our political systems require calibration. Divisive populist discourses, technologies disrupting the public debate, polarized political landscapes and rising authoritarian governance styles, to name a few, are testing the limits of democratic systems across the globe.

Club de Madrid and Boston Global Forum are set on changing the notion that democratic systems can no longer deliver. For our societies to address their many challenges, democracy needs innovation. Club de Madrid’s Annual Policy Dialogue will present far-reaching proposals to adapt our leadership styles, information ecosystems and institutional settings to the realities of the 21st Century. We need to ‘rethink democracy’ and breathe new life into the system.

Link: http://www.clubmadrid.org/policy-dialogue-2021-rethinking-democracy/

Is Data the New Frontier of Power?

Representative of BGF and AIWS.net in Riga, Professor Zaneta Ozolina, Chairwoman of LATO and the Riga Conference 2021, has organized the conference for 2021. The book Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment was discussed at a special session of the Conference. AIWS.net is also glad to introduce the session “Is Data the New Frontier of Power?” of the conference.

Decades have passed since one can consider issues of security at a regional or global level as straight forward melee combat. The number of battle-fronts a country must consider keeps increasing on a regular basis. The most recent tool to be used and targeted is the digital footprint left by any transaction, message or activity in our digital age: data. Unidentifiable resources are invested into gathering as much data as possible to be used for a variety of questionable purposes. How should we reconcile the opportunities and the vulnerabilities that stem with holistic digitalisation? How far should we go to govern the internet, the hardware and the software that enables an unparalleled level of innovation but also the threat of the rise of surveillance capitalism and openings for other national security threats?

Aura Salla, Public Policy Director, Head of EU Affairs at Facebook

Andrejs Vasiljevs, Cofounder and Chairman of the Board of Tilde, Board Member of the Big Data Value Association

Līga Raita Rozentāle, Senior Director of European Cybersecurity Policy, Microsoft

Michael Bociurkiw, Global Affairs Analyst

Josef Schroefl, Deputy Director of the COI Strategy and Defense, European Centre of Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats (Online)

Moderator: Jānis Sārts, Director, NATO Strategic Communications Centre of Excellence

 

Link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlVC9bgNB-8

Paul Nemitz and Nguyen Anh Tuan will speak about the Framework for Global Law on AI and Digital in Vietnam

The Conference “Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Humanity – The Multidimensional Impacts of a Technological Revolution” will take place on October 21th, 2021 in Hà Nội. The event is a part of the DAAS (Diderot Advanced Academic Seminars) series of IFI under the sponsorship of Vietnam National University, Hanoi (VNU), with the collaboration of Vietnam Ministry of Science and Technology.

Speakers:

Paul Nemitz, Principal Advisor in the Directorate General for Justice and Consumers, European Commission, Author of Principle Human – Democracy, Law and Ethics in the Age of Artificial Intelligence, Distinguished Contributor to Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment

Dr. Đặng Minh Tuấn, Deputy Director of the Constitutional and Administrative Law Department, School of Law, VNU

Dr. Nguyễn Văn Quân, Faculty of School of Law, VNU

Dr. Nguyễn Bích Thảo, Faculty of School of Law, VNU

Moderator: Nguyen Anh Tuan, CEO of the Boston Global Forum

Paul Nemitz will talk about his chapter “Fundamentals of International Law on AI and Digital” in Remaking the World – Toward an Age of Global Enlightenment and Global Alliance for Digital Government in building the Framework for Global Law on AI and Digital.

Speakers will present the legal system and its implementation in China, Japan, South Korea, India, Australia, Singapore, and Vietnam about Law on AI and Digital, and how to engage them to the Global Alliance for Digital Governance.

The outcome of the conference will be a report on the “Framework for Global Law on AI and Digital, a foundation of the Age of Global Enlightenment”